Brolene eye drops - Caidr
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Brolene eye drops

Written by Caidr's team of doctors and pharmacists based in UK | Updated: 04.04.2022 | 2 min read
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Brolene eye drops are antibiotic eye drops used for minor bacterial eye infections causing conjunctivitis. The eye drops can be used in anyone over the age of two, and purchased from a pharmacy after discussing your symptoms with a pharmacist. The pharmacist may suggest an alternative eye treatment that may be more appropriate than Brolene depending on your symptoms as other causes of eye infections (viral and fungal) can have very similar symptoms, but cannot be treated with antibiotic eye drops. The pharmacist may suggest a different antibiotic eye drop called chloramphenicol depending on the severity of infection.

How do I use it?

Apply 1 or 2 drops into the eye(s) up to four times daily. If there is no improvement in 48hrs or if your symptoms get worse, you should discontinue use and see your doctor. If you wear contact lenses, you should see or speak to your doctor urgently as more serious infections are more common.

How does it work?

The active drug in Brolene eye drops is propamidine, which inhibits a wide range of bacteria from growing. By doing this, it prevents your infection from getting worse while allowing your body a chance to deal with the infection. Most eye infections are self-resolving, therefore the use of Brolene eye drops speeds up normal recovery.

Should anybody avoid using them?

Brolene should not be used in children under 2 years, or if you are pregnant or breastfeeding unless directed by a doctor. If you wear contact lenses, you should see or speak to your doctor urgently as more serious infections are more common.

Are there any side-effects?

As with any medications, some people are bound to get some unwanted side effects. Some of the common ones include irritation and blurred vision. If you experience these side effects, you should discontinue use and see your doctor.

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